Apr 13, 2017

Duckling reunion

By Deanna Barth, WES San Benito

I received a call from a Ridgemark community resident around 6pm tonight. Her husband had rescued a duckling from the middle of the road. 

When I arrived to the home I was quickly invited in and shown the lone duckling, peeking out from a large box with a heat lamp on it. 

The duckling was bright and alert, vocalizing and trying desperately to jump out. No sign of injury. Likely, it had just recently become separated from its mother and siblings. 

I explained that it's always best for healthy young to remain with "mom," but that if she couldn't be found, the duckling would be taken to a wildlife hospital for care. 

Knowing hens walk their babies to the nearest body of water, I thought I'd check the closest pond. I placed the duckling inside my carrier and drove down the street to the nearest pond, which was on a golf course. 

From a distance I could only see Canada geese, but as I moved towards the water, a Mallard drake flew in low and landed in the center of the pond. I watched and waited... and from the corner of the embankment I heard peeping and a hen swam out to either greet the male or chase him off. Trailing behind her were seven ducklings the same age as the one in my possession. Yes! 

I grabbed up the little duckling and kneeled, and as the hen swam by in front of me I let the little one go (bottom right corner of photo) - it quickly joined up with the group. 

Happy reunion!

Apr 8, 2017

WES San Benito

With no wildlife center to serve San Benito County, WES' lead responder Deanna Barth has answered the call of duty by building a rescue network in her hometown of Hollister.

Over the last couple of years, Deanna has focused on building relationships with the county animal shelter and local animal rescue groups. She's got a well-established system now, so anyone who finds a wild animal in trouble will get help quickly, and the animal will receive the appropriate attention. This branch of WES is independently run by Deanna, with its own number, 831-708-WILD, to serve the area more efficiently. There's also a separate Facebook page, HERE

In preparation for the 2017 baby season, Deanna just finished renovations of a guest bedroom in her home into a wildlife intake room for those rare instances when an animal is received after hours and must stay overnight before being transferred to the nearest wildlife hospital. The closet ones are in Monterey and San Jose.

Just yesterday, Deanna's guest was a mother opossum! The animal was found curled up under a structure that was being demolished. Thankfully, the person called the local animal shelter and was quickly referred to Deanna. 

Deanna explained that in following California law the animal could not be relocated, but, she could remove the opossum and babies from harm's way and release them, carefully, back to the same property come nightfall. 

That's how Deanna spent her Friday night! 

If that sounds good to you and you'd like to work with animals, consider volunteering for rescues or transport, or, support Deanna and the San Benito chapter with a donation. Use the button below or send a check with San Benito in the memo section.


Wild animals are protected by state and federal laws that prohibit unauthorized handling and possession. In spring, healthy babies are too often 'kidnapped' and orphaned by people with good intentions. So, if you find a wild animal that appears to be in trouble, make contact with a wildlife expert before intervening - you could be doing more harm than good and placing yourself and the animal in jeopardy. 

How to find help:

1. If you have an iPhone, use the free WildHelp App to locate the nearest rescuer.

2. Google "wildlife rehabilitation" for a list of wildlife hospitals in your area.

3. In California, click HERE for a list of licensed facilities.

Apr 1, 2017

First Fawn

Spring is officially here and with it comes the busiest season for wildlife rescuers. 

Today, we responded to our first fawn call of the year - a fawn in a garage, under a car.

We suspect the newborn fawn was 'dropped' nearby and it decided the open garage looked like a good place to hide from predators and the car added even more protection.

The doe was observed in the area.

WES re-situated the fawn a few yards away under a tree in the unfenced yard and gave explicit instructions to the resident humans to keep it quiet in that part of the yard for the remainder of the day.

Deer leave their fawns for hours at a time. If you find an unattended fawn, don't panic but report it to the nearest wildlife rescue or rehabilitation center. Locate the nearest wildlife expert using the WildHelp App for Phones. Download it for free, HERE.